Organization of federal executive departments and agencies
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Organization of federal executive departments and agencies [chart] : (to accompany Committee report no. 3) : data as of January 1, 1948 by United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Expenditures in the Executive Departments.

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Published by U.S. G.P.O. in [Washington, D.C .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Executive departments -- United States -- Reorganization,
  • Administrative agencies -- United States -- Reorganization

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementUnited States Senate Committee on Expenditures in the Executive Departments
ContributionsAiken, George D. 1892-1984
The Physical Object
Pagination1 chart ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15339861M

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1. reorganize the executive branch 2. reduce the number of agencies and personnel 3. reduce the number of regulations produced by the agencies 4. reduce the level of discretionary authority the agencies exercise 5. return decision making to the state and local governments. The Statistical Agencies of the Federal Government: A Report to the Commission on Organization of the Executive Branch of the Government By Frederick C. Mills, Clarence D. Long Read preview. Agencies that offer advice in management of organization to the administration (e.g. the White House Office, the National Security Council) line agency Agencies that actually perform tasks for which the organization exists (e.g. the EPA). This publication contains data on over 9, federal civil service leadership and support positions in the legislative and executive branches of the federal government that may be subject to noncompetitive appointment (e.g., positions such as agency heads and their immediate subordinates, policy executives and advisors, and aides who report to.

The Federal Government includes 15 Cabinet departments, most of which are divided into bureaus, divisions, and sections, as well as government corporations (like the Post Office), regulatory agencies, and some independent agencies, such as NASA. Here is an alphabetical list of links to current Government of Canada Departments, Agencies, Crown Corporations, Special Operating Agencies and other related organizations. Title Supplement to and organization of federal executive departments and agencies: agencies and functions of the federal government established, abolished, continued, modified, reorganized, extended, transferred, or changed in name by legislative or executive action during calendar year and / prepared by the Office of the Federal Register, National Archives and Records.   Although the Federal Vacancies Act allows certain temporary officials to fill in for limited periods, mostly in cabinet departments and executive agencies, the absence of .